Publications

The following are recommended links to publications on Behavioral Finance:

The Journal of Investing – 25th Anniversary Issue

Reflections on 25 Years of Behavioral Finance

Brian R. Bruce

In finance, academic research on behavior started in the 1980s. The use of behavioral finance concepts in institutional investing took hold in the 1990s. Behavioral concepts guided the creation of models that used earnings expectation data beginning in 1990. It took several more years before behavioral finance started to gain traction with institutional investors. Brian Bruce, founding editor of The Journal of Investing and The Journal of Behavioral Finance, recounts how the field developed in the early years.

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The Journal of Investing

The Journal of Investing (JOI) offers practical analyses and leading-edge investment strategies used by practitioners today. Its articles lay out implementable models and critical insights – all written by industry experts and finance academics – on a range of current topics including portfolio strategy, mutual funds, ETFs, 130/30 strategies, asset allocation, and performance measurement.

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The Journal of Behavioral Finance

In the Journal of Behavioral Finance, leaders in many fields are brought together to address the implications of current work on individual and group emotion, cognition, and action for the behavior of investment markets. They include specialists in personality, social, and clinical psychology; psychiatry; organizational behavior; accounting; marketing; sociology; anthropology; behavioral economics; finance; and the multidisciplinary study of judgment and decision making.

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Analysts, Lies & Statistics

Interpreting corporate earnings announcements, understanding earnings revisions and earnings surprises is key to accurately tracking investment performance. Analysts, Lies and Statistics is the first comprehensive guide examining the process of issuing corporate earnings announcements and pre-announcements. Do financial managers and analysts mediate corporate earnings announcements, and what conflicts of interests can affect the release of corporate information?